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Poetry

Look at Hazards, Look at Losses

Look at Hazards, Look at Losses cover

Authors: Group for Conceptual Politics (GCP), Danny Hayward, Anthony Iles, Lisa Jeschke, Benjamin Noys, Eirik Steinhoff and Marina Vishmidt

Paperback ISBN: 978-86-88567-21-3

eBook ISBN: 978-86-88567-22-0

L(a)ying Down in the Banlieue

Despite commonalities between feminist poetry and Marxist feminism, they have not often crossed paths. How might writing such as Bhanu Kapil’s Ban en Banlieue be able to explore more viscerally the necessarily hidden often racialised and gendered remainders of the class relation which otherwise useful Marxist feminist categories cannot articulate fully? What, asks Amy De’Ath, can such poetry lay bare?

 

Garments Against Women

Garments Against Women

Garments Against Women by Anne Boyer, Mute Books (European Edition)

First published by Ahsahta Press, 2015.

ISBN: (paperback) 978-1-906496-38-8 price £14 16 €

104 pages, 148mm x 210mm (A5), black and white with colour covers.

Anne Boyer reading at New Voices Reading Series and the Program in Poetry and Poetics at University of Chicago, 2015. In the introduction to her reading, Boyer recalls the conversation that resulted in Mute publishing the text: 'Questions for Poets', http://www.metamute.org/editorial/articles/questions-poets, she adds: 'They chose the questions, but tonight I choose the lambs'

Nervous Costume

Madame Tlank digresses from and back to Anne Boyer’s Garments Against Women, which is many things. A memoir written by someone without a history. A garment made for no-body. A reproduction fin in a great fleet of sharks

 

Down With Supreme Whateverness: On Anne Boyer's Garments Against Women

 

a catalogue of whales that is a catalogue 

QUESTIONS FOR POETS

Brecht ventriloquised the questions of a worker who reads, and Walt Whitman declared the 'direct trial' of the poet to be – 'today'. In a time when questions, workers and trials aren't what they used to be, Anne Boyer multiplies the questions and shares their bibliography

 

What is the answer?’ Stein asked, and when no answer came she laughed and said: ‘What, then, is the question?’

So many questions.

Lotta Poetica

Youcef Sebti, extract from 'Nothing Poem'

The Arab Spring is well known for the movement of the Squares and the explosion of demands for democracy and an end to corruption in the Middle East. Within and beyond this, argues Howard Slater, it is also the product of a linguistic outer-nationalism in which singular and plural dissidents from the repressive and traumatic norms of capital in crisis elaborate a catalytic language which screams and acts in the face of everyday tyranny

At the border of spring

Flint Michigan responds to Abdellatif Laäbi's recently translated 1976 poetry collection, The Rule of Barbarism

 

Sometimes poetry can reach beyond the ideogrammes that come to fill our genes

the bacterium of a consciousness so self-conscious it cannot deplete itself

to face the widening open of the wider-than-I                            the need other

than my-own in the moment

 

Moan Manacle

Falling in Love Cream Crab

Now itch like precision flamecutting.  Detected sweat in
bloom Pakistani Sukhoi-30MKI, 
sweat that eyes in the front of your head crunch, 
pulse on detergent, broken ear on Anantnag 
bus ride flowering to a throat full of sweat,
brighter than the consumption reel it cap fades for                
            no-one half                 
            se 
by half second and is nothing except love there
is nothing except it on.  Back flowing fade

Damaged Good

In the clearing smoke scours
the photographs, hiding the animal
labour which moves insects and their
information all over the face of the earth.
I arrive in kind by light rail 
transport rough and undependable, rocking
sideways with a peg of metal to make
it ring eratogenically like spraypaint in a cylinder.
And get my tag up on the boundary stone.

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