After the Canon? An Interview with Hal Foster

Casting off from his recent book Bad News Days, art critic and October magazine co-editor Hal Foster talks to John Douglas Millar about what became of art’s critical turn, the conversion of art and its world into culture industry and, despite it all, the continuing importance of the aesthetic


Call for Issue 2. Corrupting Desires! Technique, Performance and Control

Email to: cesura.acceso@gmail.com

We are currently accepting submissions for Issue 2 of Cesura//Acceso, to be published in June 2016.

Our central theme will be: Corrupting Desires! Technique, Performance and Control.

Art’s Economic Exceptionalism

Whilst left critiques habitually relate art to capitalist commodification, few do this on strictly economic grounds, let alone cogently. Josefine Wikström argues that finally we do have a book that fulfills exactly this task



Inside Out
Marx famously described capitalism as mad and inverted. Daniel Spaulding re-examines speculative realism through an Adornian prism to disclose a thought of ‘the great outdoors’ beyond capital that is very much immanent to a world not only upside down but increasingly inside out 

The Anthropocene in 90 Minutes

In Molecular Red Mackenzie Wark collides Platonov and Bogdanov, to produce anthropocene levels of low-theory. But are these very distinctive soviet thinkers really compatible, and is acceleration really what the world needs now, asks Maria Chehonadskih

Building Downwards

In their review of Keller Easterling’s Subtraction, Luisa Lorenza Corna and Alan Adam Smart interrogate an architectural theory that makes an economic virtue of contracted social reproduction


Against Accelerationism – For Marxism

'Jetpack communism' or 'Marxist heresy'? Today's younger red tories (also known as 'left accelerationists') approach capitalism's contradictions and the threat of communism from the perspective of management, reviving a project resembling the ambiguously socialist nationalist and new right discourse of 'planisme' (developed in France and Belgium in the 1930-50s).

Art, Value, and the Freedom Fetish

If art is a commodity, is it just a commodity, subject to the law of value? Or does art's distinctive process of production render it capable of a relative, and critical, independence? Daniel Spaulding and Nicole Demby explore the relations of art, value and their imbricated, but not necessarily identical, forms of ‘freedom’, urging us to think beyond the binary of art as either liberatory and subversive or uncritical captive of capital


Chronicle of a Crash Foretold

In John Barker’s Futures, an expertly crafted crime novel exploring cocaine trafficking in Thatcherite London, Tom Jennings finds a parable of neoliberalism with considerably broader resonance


Faced with trauma, language’s impoverishment is exposed. Other emotional experiences - love, anger, depression, hunger, or even desire, that infest the body with unfamiliarity, find explication through writing. They begin with a want, so find satiation in language, or at the very least, a sense of control. Faced with trauma, language is depleted into inarticulacy, a muted mess of choked words and insubstantial descriptions.

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