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Communism

Capital and Community: On Melanie Gilligan’s Trilogy

In his assessment of the latest film in Melanie Gilligan’s trilogy on crisis, capital and community Jasper Bernes emphasises the necessity and difficulty of distinguishing between the community of capital – its expansive entrainment of the senses – and the unrealised project of a resistant human community

 

To Be a Pilgrim

Helen Macfarlane was a Chartist revolutionary, the translator who put the ‘hobgoblin’ in the Communist Manifesto, and an advocate of ‘the total demolition of the present system of things’ on Christian grounds. Peter Linebaugh welcomes the 150 years-overdue publication of her writings, invoking the Blood and Fire of that earlier ‘ruthless critic of everything that exists’, John Bunyan

Mikkel Bolt analyses the many global shades of reformism and revolution in an extended discussion of 'what is to be done with the crisis, capitalism and the revolution, beyond the avant-garde, reformism and the multitude'

 

Burning Dwelling Thinking

After the Insurrection that was to come The Invisible Committee’s À nos amis assesses the defeats and 'permanent catastrophe' which never stopped. Alberto Toscano’s extended review, ahead of the book’s English translation, seeks points of agreement among the peaks and pitfalls of a relentless metaphysical attack on network power

 

It is the rule of European culture to organise the death of the art of living.

Keepsakes: A response to Ray Brassier

Responding to the Accelerationist challenge that the Left must re-engage the project of reason, philosopher Ray Brassier has countered that we need to disentangle ‘emancipatory’ abstractions from those of capitalist rationality. Here Anna O’Lory argues that in seeking such a distinction, Brassier misdiagnoses the relationship between capitalist social relations and the (lethal) abstractions they produce

 

The Jet-Set Peasantry: where no passenger is not drunk

The rabble is a fundamental problem for Hegel argues Frank Ruda. Sacha Kahir reviews Ruda’s Rabble, piecing together and pushing onwards the fragmented parts of civil society’s cyclonic contradiction

 

Come, poor things, let us sing […]

After darkness comes light,

After evil comes the good,

Our guide and leader, Abundance,

Comes to lead us1

The Difficult Theory of a Mad World

From its central question, 'what does critical theory have to do with the critique of political economy?', Werner Bonefeld’s new book, reviewed here by Chris Wright, develops a deep engagement with the Frankfurt School, Marx and a constellation of less translated critics of the value-form

 

I find it hard to tell you

’Cause I find it hard to take

Not a Drop Left

The relationship between documentation and construction in Walter Benjamin’s work was central to his originality and another bone of amicable contention with his friend and editor Theodor Adorno.

Wandering Abstraction

Developing a presentation given at the Accelerationism symposium in Berlin December 2013, Ray Brassier draws upon the divergent theories of 'accelerationism' and 'communisation' whose mutual illumination exposes the problems of articulating cognitive abstraction and social practice

 

Comets & Barricades: Insurrectionary Imagination in Exile

Imagine history as an infernal kaleidoscopic system in which capital and its cops eternally return to shut down all possibilities of freedom. Could poetry constitute a way of writing that system a death sentence it can neither pronounce nor suppress? Poetry as the imaginative continuation and extension of insurrection, even in defeat?

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