Permanent Reproductive Crisis: An Interview with Silvia Federici

NY Wages For Housework Poster

On the occasion of the publication of an anthology of her writing and the accession of a  Wages for Housework NY archive at Mayday Rooms in London, Marina Vishmidt interviewed Silvia Federici on her extensive contribution to feminist thought and recent work on debt activism (with contributions by Mute, Mayday Rooms and George Caffentzis)


Event: Signal:Noise II

Ricardo Basbaum, 'Superpronoun: 9 Me-You Choreographies', diagram, 2003

Signal:Noise II

Friday 20 – Saturday 21 January 2012

The Showroom Gallery, 63 Penfold Street, London NW8


This arresting essay presents an in depth account of the so-called 'system-upgrade' of welfare reform in the UKplc: Universal Credit

Reposted from:


For the sword outwears its sheath,

And the soul wears out the breast,

And the heart must pause to breathe,

And love itself have rest.


Building Downwards

In their review of Keller Easterling’s Subtraction, Luisa Lorenza Corna and Alan Adam Smart interrogate an architectural theory that makes an economic virtue of contracted social reproduction


Capital and Community: On Melanie Gilligan’s Trilogy

In his assessment of the latest film in Melanie Gilligan’s trilogy on crisis, capital and community Jasper Bernes emphasises the necessity and difficulty of distinguishing between the community of capital – its expansive entrainment of the senses – and the unrealised project of a resistant human community


Art, Value, and the Freedom Fetish

If art is a commodity, is it just a commodity, subject to the law of value? Or does art's distinctive process of production render it capable of a relative, and critical, independence? Daniel Spaulding and Nicole Demby explore the relations of art, value and their imbricated, but not necessarily identical, forms of ‘freedom’, urging us to think beyond the binary of art as either liberatory and subversive or uncritical captive of capital


Chronicle of a Crash Foretold

In John Barker’s Futures, an expertly crafted crime novel exploring cocaine trafficking in Thatcherite London, Tom Jennings finds a parable of neoliberalism with considerably broader resonance


Faced with trauma, language’s impoverishment is exposed. Other emotional experiences - love, anger, depression, hunger, or even desire, that infest the body with unfamiliarity, find explication through writing. They begin with a want, so find satiation in language, or at the very least, a sense of control. Faced with trauma, language is depleted into inarticulacy, a muted mess of choked words and insubstantial descriptions.

To Be a Pilgrim

Helen Macfarlane was a Chartist revolutionary, the translator who put the ‘hobgoblin’ in the Communist Manifesto, and an advocate of ‘the total demolition of the present system of things’ on Christian grounds. Peter Linebaugh welcomes the 150 years-overdue publication of her writings, invoking the Blood and Fire of that earlier ‘ruthless critic of everything that exists’, John Bunyan

In and Out of Art and Work: On the W.A.G.E. Certificate

In 2014 W.A.G.E. (Working Artists and the Greater Economy) launched a campaign of certification which ‘publicly recognizes non-profit arts organizations [...] paying artist fees that meet a minimum payment standard’. Josefine Wikström assesses the campaign’s aims within art’s complex relation to the capitalist division of labour


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